Following the unprecedented plunge of the naira in value against the U.S dollars and other hard currencies, naira has been falling for over 70% to the previous exchange rate since the early 2014. As at today the value of naira to 1 US dollar in the black market is around 460.
The widening premium between the parallel market rate and the official rate has increased and even worsen the currency situation.
Here are the lists of Nigerian benefiting from the fall of naira;
Nigerian in Diaspora
It is very now easy for Nigerian in diaspora to make more money than ever before since the plunge of the naira, the amount of money they are making at every month has now increased above of the amount they normally get when the dollar rate was still stable. Presently, is as though this is the best time to live and work in America, at the same time the good time for people living abroad to acquire properties in Nigeria.
Bloggers in Nigeria
The income of bloggers in Nigeria has continued to increase from time to time since the continuous fall of naira. The exchange rate is really making sense to them, at the end of every month they will just enter the bank, collect their dollars (money), take it to black market to sell and come back home with smile.
Forex Trader
The forex traders in Nigeria are not left out in this season of naira falling, the conversion rate is really paying them compare to when the rate was 199.
Families, Friends and Cronies of people in the central bank of Nigeria (CBN)
Since the continuous fall of naira, the allies and people who are connected to the staffs of the central bank are using the opportunity to buy dollars at the official price are using it to make a lot of income through the black market.
Bureau De Change (BDC) Operator
The Central Bank of Nigeria CBN has banned the sales of forex to Bureau de change operator since January when they discovered they are purchasing the dollars at the official price of 199 and selling it at the black market rate, although they are still making a lot of money till now, but not as much as the time when the Central Bank of Nigeria was yet to ban the sale of dollars.